Join DJJ in the Poor People’s Campaign!

24129989_111101673006386_5105155563160087639_n.jpgLast week, I spent the afternoon in St. Peter’s Church training for the Poor People’s Campaign. Answering the question of what brought him there, the fellow next to me said, “people are suffering, and it’s past time that churches stepped up.” So when it came my turn I said, “people are suffering, and it’s past time that synagogues stepped up!”

The campaign is calling for a season of resistance. For 40 days, in 30 states, thousands will gather weekly at their capitals. Every Mondaybetween Mother’s and Father’s Day, we will join together “to challenge the evils of systemic racism, poverty, the war economy, ecological devastation and the nation’s distorted morality.”

31148127_10156190917949519_1247800140_o.jpgLast week, over 30 DJJ’niks met with a national organizer to understand the history, goals and gameplan of this powerful movement. We pledged not only to show up in Lansing, but to create a robust Jewish presence in the MI Poor People’s Campaign.

Can you join us? Click here to participate in one or more days of action.

We will help coordinate transportation. We encourage everyone to study the campaign’s Covenant of Nonviolence and Principles. Most in attendance will be acting as supporters: if you are interested in participating in Civil Disobedience, training is required. Please indicate on the form and we will alert you to training opportunities.

At right: DJJ leaders discuss the PPC Covenant of Nonviolence and Principles.

Ever since hearing about the revival of the Poor People’s Campaign, I have felt energized about this incredible opportunity to join with other faith communities and people of common vision to demand a more just world. I’m grateful to be part of a community so deeply committed to this messy, joyful, hopeful, and holy work.

L’shalom,

r.a.a.

P.S. Visit our blog to watch a clip of my remarks (shofar in hand!) at the Detroit PPC mass meeting with Rev. William Barber II.

P.P.S. Check out my Torah commentary on civil disobedience and faith featured in the Detroit Jewish News.

 

 


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